Scioto County Chapter, OGS
Scioto County Township History
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Scioto County is located in the south-central portion of the state bordering on the Ohio River. U.S. Route 52, and State Routes 125, 140, 348 and 522 cross the county east and west and U.S. Route 23, and State Routes 73, 104, 139, 335, and 772 run north and south. The confluence of the Scioto and Ohio Rivers occurs in Scioto County. For the history of the townships of Scioto County, please see below the maps.

Bloom Township

This township is noted for its great deposits of iron ore, coal and fire-clay. The township covers a little less than 49 square miles. The settlement of Bloom Township was at an early day, but the date of arrival of the first pioneer was not obtainable. There were enough, however, to organize a township August, 1812. Among those who were there from 1805 to 1810 were: Samuel Baker, Samuel Bennett, Benjamin Bennett, Jr., Joshua Gilman, John Bennett, Mr. Edgar, Samuel Malone and others. Some old settlers who's lives date back to early childhood in Bloom Township were: John Bennett, Madison Cole, John Phillips, Washington Richey, Dr. William Watts, John Loomis, J.W. Crawford and Branson Miles.

The Webster Fire-Brick and Coal Company was organized in the fall of 1869, the officers being John Bennett, President; George Edmunds, Secretary; and W.S. Gillilan, Superintendent. They made bricks in all shapes for furnaces, rolling mills, gas-works, lime-kilns, etc., shipping their goods to Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and the Southern States, besides all over the State of Ohio.

Bloom Furnace, located in northwestern portion of section 30, in Bloom Township, was built in 1830 by Christian Benner and two sons, John and Joshua. It was run by different parties until 1874, when it went out of blast. In 1879 J.D. Clare, J.H. Simmons and Oliver Lyons bought the property and immediately started the furnace again.

Scioto Furnace was erected in 1828 by General Wm Kendall, one of the pioneers of Scioto County. It went into blast that year. It changed hands several times, the last company to purchase it being L.C. Robinson & Co.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

 

Greene Township

Greene Township is the southeastern township of the county and is noted for being what is known as the French Grant, its southern boundary being Lawrence County and the Ohio River, and the latter is also its western boundary. Porter township is on the north and Vernon township and Lawrence County bound it on the east. It has an area of 22,236 acres.

The Ohio Furnace was located in Greene Township, something over a mile from the Ohio River and only about three miles from its eastern border. Ohio Furnace was laid out in 1844 by David Sinton and Thos. W. Means. The furnace went into blast June, 1845, John T. Woodrow being superintendent, and fourteen hands employed that year. It continued in blast for thirty-seven years without a break, except for repairs, and was blown out February 24, 1882.

The Union Furnace was erected in 1826 by James Rogers, John Sparks, John Means and Valentine Fear. It went into blast in 1827 and continued for several years.

The Junior Furnace was built in 1828, was in blast in 1829 and blown out in 1865.

The Franklin Furnace is another of those that once had a busy life but has been out of blast since 1860. It went into blast in 1827, and was the property of Daniel Young, John Young, Jesse Y. Whitcomb, Josiah Merrill, John Hurd and Martin Ruter, all from New Hampshire.

The old settlers of the French Grant were the French immigrants, but they were not inured to hardship and were little calculated to buffet the storms and trials of pioneer life. A few settled on the grant, many more remained in Gallipolis, and others returned to France as soon as they could dispose of their gift from Congress. The Cadots, the Duduits, the Valodines, Gervaise, Bertrand, Chabot, Dufliquy, Ginats, Ruishoud, Vincent and a few others of the French colony settled on the grant. Some of these, however, also sold out. Some of the names mentioned who received land were: Jno G. Gervais, Matthew Bartlet, Thomas Gilruth, Widow Hempstead, Nicholas Thevenin, Robert Buchanan, Vincent Ferguson, John Haily, Wm. Haily, , Thayer D. White, Luke Kelly, Darby Kelly, Peter Vanbibber, Daniel Wolford, George Austin, George Steward, Wm. Kelly, Wm. Forester, Michael Bacus, Peter Bacus, Francis Valodin, Wm Didway, John Fletcher, Eli Barton, Jno. Bertrand, John Gennett, Jno. Stump, Peter Fort, Kimber Barton, John Bacus, Jno. Davisson, Jacob Suitor, Jos. Crank.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Nile Township

Nile Township is the largest in the county. The township is the extreme southwest of the county and has an Ohio River front of nearly 15 miles.

The township is bounded on the north by Brush Creek and Union townships; on the east by Washington township and the Ohio River; south by the Ohio River and west by Adams County. It has a land area of 48,140 acres.

The pioneers of Nile Township were a sturdy set of men. The names of all cannot her be given but many others who made Nile Township their home will be found in the old settlers' list in the county history. Among those who left the impress of their lives upon the progress of the township were David Mitchell, Geo. Hutton, Geo. Kinney, Jno Tucker, Abraham Tucker, Sr., Jesse Williams, Thos. Cooper, Solomon McCall, John Calloway and Middleton Harmon.

Buena Vista is one of the prettiest little villages on the Ohio River, lying in the extreme southwest corner of the township and county. It is eighteen miles from Portsmouth by the turnpike and about twenty by the river. The place is the principal shipping point for the numerous stone quarries in its neightborhood. The shipping of freestone is its principal business.

Friendship is located in a pleasant little valley on the bank of Turkey Creek and about one mile north of the Portsmouth and Buena Vista turnpike.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Portsmouth, Ohio (Wayne Twp)

Portsmouth was platted in 1803, but it's history extends back to the establishment of a community called Alexandria on the west bank of the Scioto River, an Indian word meaning "fresh water". Repeated flooding of the lowlands on which Alexandria was built prompted Major Henry Massie to lay out a new community on the higher east bank. He named it Portsmouth to honor his former home, Portsmouth, Virginia. The floods eventually destroyed Alexandria, but Portsmouth grew.

The city was incorporated by the state legislature in 1814, but it was not until the legislature authorized the town council to provide support for schools in 1838 that the first public schools were established. Prior to that, several fee schools were conducted by trained educators, the first established in a log house in 1823.

The first religious services were conducted in 1813 by a Methodist minister. The following year saw the arrival of the first circuit preacher. By 1875, Portsmouth had 15 church buildings and a synagogue.

Two factors contributed to the early growth of the community. One was the Ohio River, a major transportation asset. Completion in 1832 of the 300-mile-long Ohio-Erie Canal added significantly to this asset. It meant that goods produced in northern Ohio could be brought to Portsmouth for transfer to steamboats which navigated the Ohio River. The second contributing factor was iron. Smelting furnaces sprung up throughout the Portsmouth area and have left behind names like Franklin Furnace and Scioto Furnace, now assigned to the small settlements that developed around them.

The railroad arrived in the area in 1853 and continues to be an important asset to the economic health of Portsmouth and the neighboring communities. The Chesapeake and Ohio Eastern Railway bridge at suburban Sciotoville, built in 1917, is one of the world's longest continuous spans. The bridge and its approaches extend one-third of a mile. It is considered to be one of the world's ten most notable railroad bridges.

Flooding of the Ohio and Scioto Riveres plagued much of the early history of Portsmouth. Certain floods were guaged by high water marks on the walls of a local tavern. The particularly disasterous flood of 1937 spurred construction of a flood wall system that has since held back high water.

One survivor of those early floods is the Boneyfiddle district of Portsmouth with its pre-1900 architecture. Today, this area is the subject of intensive restoration and surely will become one of the state's most notable attractions for tourists, historians and architecture buffs. Its beautiful Old Market Square sector, with its collection of shops and splendid housing for senior citizens, has already become a prominent cultural focal point in the community. A long range plan for redevelopment calls for continuing expansion of business in the area, construction of riverfront condominiums and recreation areas, revitalization of other housing in the area and development of the district's distinctive cultural assets.

Portsmouth is the home of a number of notable personalities in the arts, sports, politics and business. Among the prominent names are Jesse Stuart, poet laureate of Kentucky; artists Woddi Ishmael, Richard Zoellner and Clarence Carter; cowboy actor Roy Rogers; band leader Clyde McCoy; William Lucas, an early Ohio govenor; Shakespearean actress Julia Marlowe; baseball greats Branch Rickey, Del Rice, Rocky Nelson, Al Oliver, Larry Hisle, Don Gullett and Gene Tenace; and two novelists: Barbara Webb Robinson, author of "The Best Christmas Pageant Ever" which has been produced for television; and Lou Anne Walden, a popular romance writer.

The above information abstracted from a Profile Publication created and produced for The Portsmouth Area Chamber of Commerce in 1984.

Brush Creek Township

The county map shows this township to have the most territory, but the tax duplicate gives Nile Township the largest number of acres assessed at 48,140 while Brusch Creek Township contains only 47,847 acres. It is of irregular form, its western border being about eighteen miles from north to south, while its greatest width is less than nine miles.

Brush Creek was organized in 1820. It is bounded on the north by Pike County, on the east by Morgan and Union townships, on the southeast by Union, and south by Nile and west by Adams County. On September 26, 1878 another slight change was made adding a portion of the township to that of Union, and the latter was to pay the assessment of the territory given to her.

Brush Creek has a few pioneers scattered here and there over her vast and rugged territory and among the number were Jesse Edwards, Samuel Edwards, Isme Freeman, Aaron Armstrong, Christopher Oppy, Thornton Kendall, John Liston, Henry Caraway, James Jones, William Thompson, Joshua Armstrong, Thomas Brown, James Wilson, William White, Joseph and James Walker, Xenthus Kennedy and Peter Randall.

The townships records from organization up to 1887 were destroyed by fire.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Harrison Township

This township was organized March 6, 1832. It is bounded on the north by Madison, on the east by Bloom, on the south by Porter and on the west by Clay and a portion of Jefferson. It covers a surface of 24,320 acres.

Harrison township, along the valley of the Little Scioto, was settled as early as 1798. A few years later quite a number of early pioneers had found homes and erected mills along this water-course. There was much good hunting along this stream and the hills on either side and the eastern part of the township were famous hunting ground for the pioneer. Among the old settlers were: Simeon Wood, Joseph Bennett, Solomon Monroe, George Bowers, S.T. Shumway, Saul Crull, R.T. Collins, Daniel White, John White, Thos. Feurt, Jno Snyder and Robt. Bennett.

The township officers in 1832 were: Trustees, Daniel White, Thomas Hatch and Sylvanus Shumway; Clerk, Abijah Batterson; Treasurer, Abner B. Wood; Overseers of Poor, Henry Bower and Simeon Wood; Constables, George Scott and Royal T. Collis; Justices, T.R. Wood and Luther Wheeler.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Madison Township

The township of Madison occupies the northeastern corner of Scioto County, but does not extend as far east as Bloom. The township includes about 50 square miles. In 1810, back of which date the records are lost, Madison was one of ten townships which formed Scioto County.

As the mouth of the Little Scioto was the site of the first permanent settlement in the county, it was perfectly natural that the valley should be explored up as far as Madison Township at a very early day. Settlements were made here as early as 1797. Between this date and 1820 the following are some of the settlers who made their homes in this township: Robert, Caleb, John and Charles Bennett, Edward Dawson, Absalom Pyle, Jacob Rickey, Nathaniel Squires, Andrew Snyder, Daniel Dodge, Jas. Rockwell, Joseph Rockwell, Benjamin Rockwell, Ephraim Rowell, Johnathan Rockwell, Ezra Rockwell, James Field, Aaron Miller, Jacob Myers, Jeremiah Brittainham, Michael Milliron, Moses Mault, George Dever, Wm. Dever, Wm. Stockham, John Fullerton, Samuel Low, John Rickey, Daniel Massberger, Wm Plum, Edward Milam, John Slavens, George Adams, Peter Lagore, Thomas Phillips, John, Hiram and Thomas McDowell, William and Henry Crull, John Higgins, James Brian, Wm. Kitchen, Jess and John Martin, Moses, Barnebus, Solomon, Aaron and Jesse Monroe, Joseph Couthorn and Judiah Mead.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Porter Township

Porter Township has the honor of being the first settled in Scioto County, claiming Sam'l Marshall, Jno. Lindsay, Isaac Bonser, Uriah Barber as its first settlers.

Porter Township has an Ohio River front of fully ten miles and also has the valley of the Little Scioto within its borders for a distance of five miles.

In regard to size Porter Township is the smallest of the fifteen townships, outside of Portsmouth, comprising the municipal division of the county. It is bounded on the north by Harrison Township, on the east by Vernon, on the south by Greene and the Ohio River and on the west by the Ohio River and Clay Township.

When the county was organized in 1803, the present territory of Porter was a part of Wayne and Greene townships, and it was not until 1814 Porter became a separate municipality, the order forming it made December 6, 1814.

There are names of many of the old pioneers of Porter Township entered among the list of old settlers given in the history of Scioto County, and among those are: Madison Price, Elias Marshall, Levi Smith, Jonathan Hurd, James Littlejohn, Theodore Bliss, Isaac Fullerton, John Baccus, Mr. and Mrs. Gibbens.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Union Township

Union Township was one of the origninal townships and took in a part of Washington, which was made from Nile and Union, all of Rush and Morgan, and probably all of Brush Creek except what belonged to Nile. It has now been curtailed of its dimensions to a considerable extent, and from being one of the largest in the county at its organization in 1803, it is now one of middle size, eight townships being larger and six smaller, not counting Portsmouth.

Union Township is now bounded on the north by Brush Creek and a corner of Morgan townships, east by Rush, south by Washington and Nile and west by Brush Creek township. It has an area of 19,118 acres, the land being very broken and hilly, with a far better surface for stock-raising than for that of grain.

In 1867 Rush was taken bodily from Union Township, which caused its sudden loss in 1870, but in the last decade it has grown wonderfully. The old settlers of this township came in early, but it is doubtful if the territory now known as Union Township was settled until some time about 1808 or 1809. What is now Rush and Washington Townships, lying in the valley of the Scioto, was, when this county was organized, called Union Township, and it was settled as early as 1796 at the lower end, for Alexandria was part of Union Township then, and the upper part of the valley, now Rush was settled in 1797. Thus in giving names of old settlers, many of them will not be found in the Union Township of today, but of that part of Union Township whish is now designated as Washington and Rush. The following names were settlers of Union Township between 1796 and 1802: Peter Noel, William Russell, James Norris, Phillip Moore, John Collins, Gabriel Feurt, Benjamin Feurt, William Lucas, Jr., John Noel, William Campbell, John Devers, Peter Noel, Jr., John Pollock, Conrad Throne, John White, Henry Utt, William Robey, James Collins, Joseph Williamson and Thomas Williamson.

Gabriel Feurt was the first Collector of Union Township in 1803 and continued for five years. The first Assessor, or in those days called "Listers", was David Gharky, who first came to Alexandria and was for years a prominent citizen of Scioto County. In 1921 Samuel G. Jones, who was also well known in early days, moved up to the mouth of Brush Creek to help General Kendall build his mills, was Justice of the Peace of Union in 1821.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Vernon Township

Vernon Township lies in the southeastern part of the county and was formerly part of Upper and Franklin Townships. It was organized in 1818 and is bounded on the north by Bloom Township, on teh east by Bloom and Lawrence County, on the south by Lawrence County and Greene Township and on the west by Greene and Porter Townships. It has an area of 22,890 acres.

Vernon township was early settled and very hunted over two or three years before the first permanent settler located his claim. The last buffalo killed in this section of country was by Phillip Salladay in Vernon Township about 1798 and on the farm of Mr. Chaffin. Soon after this a few pioneers settled on Pine Creek. Among those who first made Vernon Township their home were: David Salladay, Rueben Smith, Reuben Chaffin, Shadrack Chaffin, Nathaniel Searl, Wyatt Chamberlin, Lemuel Cadot, Jacob Halterman, Richard Malone, Robert Bradshaw, William Bacon, Samuel Perry, Peter Bussey, Edward Barkalow, Francis Duteil, Lewis Duteil, James Patton, John Patton and Jerry Patton.

Chaffin's Mill was erected by John Shope in 1816, sold to Henry Summer in 1819. The latter kept it one year when he disposed of it to Thomas Burt in 1820, who, after running it until 1823, sold out to T.S. Hayward. Mr. Hayward owned it until 1829 or 1830, when Reuben Chaffin became the owner and held it until 1863. It changed hands several times since passing through ownership of Dearborn Emory, Willis Newland adn Aaron Hollinshead and finally becoming the property of Jacob Newland. It is a saw and grist mill and has a general store in connection. It is located on teh southeast corner of section 10, on Pine Creek.

The Howard Furnace was started in 1852 by Campbell, Woodrow & Co. who continued the business until 1868. The Charcoal Iron Company took hold of it in 1870 and ran it until 1877, then they disposed of it to John Campbell. The furnace was started up December 1879 by Mr. Campbell, but only ran two years when it stopped again.

The Clinton Furnace was erected in 1832 and went into blast the same year. It continued until September 22, 1848 when Thomas G. Gaylord sold it to Glidden, Smith & Co. The furnace was then run until March 1, 1851. Mr. Smith retired and George Crawford became a member of the firm and the business continued under the name of Glidden, Crawford & Co. This firm kept the furnace in blast until October 15, 1867, when Mr. Crawford purchased the interest of the other partners and took in Wm J. Bell, changing the firm name to Crawford & Bell. The firm remained in blast until the fall of 1873.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Clay Township

Clay Township lies on the east bank of the Scioto River and its southern boundary is Wayne Township and the Ohio River. It is bounded on the north by Jefferson and Valley townships, on the east by Harrison and Porter townships. It has an irregular boundary line with an area of about 17,000 acres.

The organization of the township was on June 7, 1826, but there has been some slight changes at different times since.

The officers elected at the first election in the township in 1826 were: Trustees, Gabriel Feurt, Asa Andrews, Enoch Lawson; Clerk, Turner M. Martin; Treasurer, Dennis Smith; Justice of the Peace, Jacob Noel; Constable Jonathan Cutler.

The voting precinct is at the Noel Schoolhouse. The only saw-mill in the country is located on Munn's Run, owned by P. Summers, but in the summer of 1883 was lying idle. For fine farms, good residences and solid farmers, Clay Township is willing to compare notes with her sister townships.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Jefferson Township

Jefferson Township was undoubtedly one of the original townships or was a township before 1810. Four of the original townships named and known in 1810 are not now on the map - Seal, Upper, Lick and Franklin. The loss of the county commissioners records from 1803 to 1811 inclusive prevents the dates being given of teh organization of the township, but if it is one of the original divisions it was organized May, 1803 and at all events before 1810. Seal Township, which lay on both sides of the Scioto River, was taken from the map, and that portion lying east of the Scioto was added to Jefferson. The township then extended further south, and also took in all of the present township of Valley, which was cut off from Jefferson in 1860.

The township of Jefferson is bounded on the north by Pike County, east by Madison and Harrison townships, on the south by Clay and on the west by Valley. Jefferson Township contains 14,383 acres. A good portion of Jefferson Townships records are lost and what are found are of mixed dates.

The settlement of Jefferson Township was at a pretty early day, but at that time Valley Township was then Jefferson, and the earliest settlers were located in the valley of the Scioto River. The present Jefferson Township was settled about 1808, though up to 1815 very few pioneers had found permanent homes within its limits. Among those who came in the early days of history were: Jesse Rice, Daniel McLaughlin, Daniel Conklin, Jared Spriggs, Thomas Carlisle, Abner Field, William Mitchell, Aaron Gee, Richard Grimshaw, Joshua Tritt, Rodney Marshall, Smauel Farmer, Jacob Crouse and J.H. Munn.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Morgan Township

Morgan Township was organized June 7, 1825 and was formerly part of Seal Township and then of Union. It lies on the Scioto River; is rather of an oblong shape, with a surface hilly, rough and broken.

Morgan Township was first settled about 1804, although a portion of the valley bottoms undoubtedly found tenants a year or two earlier. Hezekiah Merritt settled on the east side as early as 1796, just above Lucasville, but he was a pioneer and claims to have raised the first crop of corn in the county.

However, definite knowledge is had that Morgan Township had more than one settler in 1804 and that it grew in population along the Scioto River which skirts its easstern boundary for some seven miles.

Among the first settlers were the Shelpmans, the Deavers, the Murphys, Noels, Corbleys, Glazes, Walls and Nices, the first four being known to have come as early as 1801-1805, if not earlier. The Deavers sold property in 1806 and the Noels are among the early pioneers before the organization of the county in 1803, or about that time. Some of the old settlers who are now dead are remembered well. Of these were A. Noel, Thomas Morgan, Abraham Glaze, Isaac Glaze, David Shelpman, Spicer Shelpman, Joshua Cutler and Pliney Cutler.

The oldest settlers now living in the township are Abraham Shively, Elias Simpson, William Shelpman and David Glaze. There are also a few more nearly as aged as those above mentioned.

The first Justice of the Peace after its organization was William Deaver, as near as we can learn, the township records being missing.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Rush Township

Rush Township was the last of the municipal divisions of the county organized and was taken wholly from Union Township, June 3, 1867. It lies on the Scioto River, a distance of some seven miles north and south and the largest and best portion of its agricultural area is in the valley. In length the township, north and south, will average about seven miles. Rush township contains approximately 14,500 acres.

A Curiosity: On the farm of Henry Russell, on the top of what is known as Cambell's Hill is a spot, which is a depression of the earth's surface, to the extent of twenty feet in diameter, and about three feet deep. It is very nearly circular in form and its peculiarity is in the fact that it generates heat in winter. In the coldest weather, with snow on the ground all around it, and the thermometer below zero, no snow as found in the depression or hole, and on holding a thermometer on the bottom it rose to fifty-six degrees above zero within ten minutes. The depression has a pebbly bottom, very little dirt seen, and has probably filled up in part. This has been the condition of the spot since its discovery a half century ago. Where does it lead to?

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Valley Township

While the territory of Valley Township was as early settled permanently as any in the county, Valley Township did not come into existance until 1860, and then too late for the United States census of that year. It was first a portion of Seal Township. A few years after, or in 1814, Seal Township elected its last Assessor and in 1815 that on the west side of the river was given to Union Township and the east side to Jefferson. This remained the territory of Jefferson until June 4, 1860.

The area of the township is 15,477 acres of land and the township is bounded on the north by Pike County, on the east by Jefferson township, on the south by Clay township and on the west by the Scioto River, which separates it from Rush and Morgan townships.

The first settler of Valley township was Hezekiah Merritt, who planted the first corn in the township, one of three corn crops raised in the summer of 1796. Mr. Merritt several years after removed to Ross County, but he was the First Justice of the Peace in that section of the county in 1804-06. Jacob Groninger came in 1798; then Henry Spangler, Wm Marsh, Jas. O. Johnson, Isaac N. Johnson, A.F. Miller, Mark Snyder and Caleb B. Crull. The oldest settlers are: L. Groninger, W.A. Marsh, Jas. D. Thomas, Jno. L. Jones, G.O. James and Joseph Brandt, Sr.

Valley township is all its name implies, for it lies wholly within the valley of the Scioto, on the east side of the river and extends back to the hills with only an average width of perhaps two and a half miles, or a little over. It is of course the best agricultural township in the county.

Lucasville is the only village in Valley Township and is pleasantly situated upon a rising eminence, sloping to the west on the bank of the stream that forms the island in the Scioto River, opposite the place. The distance from Portsmouth and the Ohio River is ten miles, nearly due north and the Scioto Valley Railroad passes within its limits. The village of Lucasville was laid out by Captain John Lucas in June 1819 and the record of the survey received and recorded Aug. 7, 1819. Captain Lucas built the first tavern in the village and kept it until his death in 1825. His house for a long time was headquarters for the Democratic leaders of Southern Ohio.

The above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

Washington Township

Washington Township, originally Union Township or a part thereof, is about as old settled as any portion of the county. There is only a few months difference between the settlement of what is now Washington Township and those settlements on and near the Little Scioto and the French Grant. It is a township old in ancient history, for it was once the home of the Mound Builders and later of the earliest white settlers north of the Ohio. The last hostile indian killed in Scioto County drew his last breath near John Craig's, at deer lick. It was John McDonald or his brother, probably the latter, who did the killing, for he claimed to have built the first cabin ever erected where the waters of the Scioto mingled with that of the "La Belle Riviere".

In the Summer of 1797, Thomas Parker, who had been a Colonel in the Revolutionary war, located his land warrants, for he had two or more, at and near the old mouth of the Scioto River. HIs brother, Alexander, laying off the town. The following is the record: "I do hereby certify that this plan contains the in and out lots of the town of Alexandria laid out by me and laid down on the scale of twenty poles to an inch, done by the order of Colonel Thomas Parker, of Frederick County, Va. Alexandria, June 3, 1799. E. Langham".

"I do hereby certify that this plan contains the lots in the town of Alexandria, which I have sold as such for Colonel Thomas Parker of Frederick County, Va., situated in the county of Adams, in the Territory northwest of the Ohio. A. Parker."

"Sale of the lots in Alexandria will commence at 12 o'clock, at the corner of the river of Thomas Street, on Lot No. 19. Filed in the Recorder's Office, June 4, 1799. John Bell, Recorder of Adams County."

This was the first town laid off in Scioto County, and it was settled in the fall of 1796. The first school taught and the first schoolhouse erected and the first donation of land or lot for school purposes in Scioto County was in Washington Township as now known, and in the town of Alexandria, now unknown, except by the tradition of the past. Scioto's first county seat was then located here. One of the first associate Judges, John Collins, lived here. When it was first setled it was part of Adams County, the fourth organized county in the State, or rather Territory, of OHio, which was in 1797. When Scioto became a county in 1805, Washington Township was known as Union; afterward Nile was a part of its territory. It was not until 1814 that Washington Township came into existence and under the following: A petition for a new township, to be made out of Union and Nile, came before the commissioners at the August term, 1814, and it was granted on the first day thereof. It read as follows: "Ordered, that the township prayed for bounded as follows: beginning at the mouth of Turkey Creek; thence up the Ohio River with its meanderings thereof to the mouth of the Scioto River; thence up the Scioto River to the mouth of Pond Creek; thence westerly course with Thomas Wilcoxon's upper line to the dividing ridge between Pond Creek and Carey's Run, and following said ridge to the head of Stoney Creek; thence down said creek to Turkey Creek; thence down Turkey Creek to the Ohio River. And it is further ordered that said township be called Washington."

Among the first pioneers who first settled in Washington will be found in the list of settlers in Union Township history, among those are: Lemuel Moss, James Andrews, Joseph and Thomas Williamson, Levi Moore, Francis Cleveland, David Roup, Sylvester Veach, Stephen Casey, Isaac Williams, Anthony Clifford, Mrs. Milly Moore, John Worley, James Edison, William Carey, Hiram Devers, John F. Smith, Miss Rebecca Smith, Roswell Crane, Abel Bradford, Isaac Worley, Joshua Nurse, Samuel B. Nurse and a few others who names were forgotten.

TThe above information abstracted from the Newsletter of SCCOGS and from the publication "History of the Lower Scioto Valley: both of which contains more information on the above township and individuals. See our books and publications page to order.

SCCOGS * PO Box 812 * Portsmouth * OH * 45662